3/19/2019: Commandant to deliver State of the Coast Guard Address

Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Karl Schultz will deliver the 2019 State of the Coast Guard Address, at 10 a.m., PST, Thursday, March 21, from Coast Guard Base Los Angeles/Long Beach. This is Schultz’s first State of the Coast Guard Address since his tenure as commandant began in 2018. Schultz will provide a current overview of the service and outline priorities for the year ahead.


3/18/2019: Atlantic Coast Port Access Route Study: Port approaches and international entry and departure transit areas

The Coast Guard announced in the Federal Register that it is beginning a new study of routes used by ships to access ports on the Atlantic Coast of the United States. The Ports and Waterways Safety Act requires the Coast Guard to study potential traffic density and assess the need for safe access routes for vessels. The Coast Guard coordinates with Federal and State agencies, and considers the views of the maritime community, environmental groups, and other interested stakeholders in order to reconcile the need for safe access routes with other reasonable waterway uses in the study area.


3/6/2019: MSIB 002-19 – Parasailing navigation rules and flight safety

The Coast Guard and the Federal Aviation Administration regulate the vessels that may tow parasailers and flight activities, respectively. The Coast Guard regulates small passenger vessels and other vessels that conduct parasail operations. This does not include oversight of parasailing equipment, safety of passenger(s) aloft or interference with aircraft or banners being towed by aircraft. The FAA regulates parasail flight activities as well as aircraft and banners towed by aircraft. MSIB 002-19 addresses Navigation Rules relevant to the operations of the vessel pulling the parasail wing and provides information to promote safety while operating with passengers aloft in the vicinity of aircraft that may or may not be towing banners.


2/28/2019: A century and a half of marine safety and prevention – The Congressional Act of Feb. 28, 1871

In this post, Rear Adm. John Nadeau offers a few thoughts on The Congressional Act of 1871, which provided the nation with the basis of a functioning marine safety code. The Act of 1871 was an important change that combined all the practical features of previous legislation with a number of new requirements to form a coherent and unified body of law for the regulation of steamboats and to prevent marine casualties and loss of life.


2/7/2019: International Ice Patrol resumes operations, daily iceberg warning products for 2019 ice season

The Coast Guard International Ice Patrol announced it has commenced operations for the 2019 ice season as of Feb. 5, 2019 and will resume production of the North American Ice Service daily iceberg warning products from its operations center in New London, Connecticut.


2/5/2019: Commandant discusses Arctic, Subchapter M, and more in INSIGHTS interview

Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Karl Schultz recently did an interview with Marine Link Magazine staff for its Jan. 30, 2019, edition of INSIGHTS. During the interview, Schultz discussed a variety of issues relavent to the maritime industry, and as a courtesy Maritime Commons is providing a link to the article in an effort to keep our subscribers informed.


1/24/2019: Commercial vessel safety during lapse in appropriations

With passage of a continuing resolution, Marine Safety Information Bulletin 01-19 is cancelled effective Feb. 1, 2019.


12/21/2018: Port Access Route Study: Alaskan Arctic Coast

The Coast Guard announced in the Federal Register that it is seeking public comments as part of an Alaskan Arctic Coast Port Access Route Study (AACPARS) to evaluate the need for establishing vessel routing measures along the Arctic Coast of the United States for vessels proceeding to or from ports or places of the United States and transiting within the United States Exclusive Economic Zone.


11/26/2018: NOAD Schema 3.6 and Nat’l Vessel Movement Center Workbook 7.6 released

The National Vessel Movement Center recently announced release of updated Notices of Arrival and Departure schema version 3.6, as part of efforts to enhance maritime domain awareness and improve handling of essential data contained within NOAD.


11/8/2018: Avoiding tragedy 100 years after Princess Sophia sinking

Many of the safety items that Coast Guard foreign passenger vessel examiners check for are directly related to the lessons learned from the Princess Sophia disaster. For example, the primary cause of the grounding was a loss of awareness of the navigational picture that allowed the vessel to strike a charted and well-known hazard. As part of a cruise ship examination, the exam team checks the functionality of navigational equipment such as electronic charting systems, radars, and depth sounders, as well as the ship crew’s proficiency with using these systems. The team also reviews crewmembers’ licenses and training certificates to ensure that they meet the minimum qualifications to fill these key shipboard positions. In this post, read about how, the past 100 years have allowed for the development of robust regulations to ensure the safety of all passengers booking passage on one of these non-U.S. vessels.


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