9/7/2018: LGC NCOE publishes latest issue of ‘The Gas Gauge’ newsletter

The Coast Guard’s Liquefied Gas Carrier National Center of Expertise published its 2018 Summer edition of The Gas Gauge, a newsletter to share Coast Guard involvement and regulatory updates about the liquefied gas industry.


9/4/2018: Towing industry safety statistics for 2017

The Coast Guard, in partnership with the American Waterways Operators, released the National Quality Steering Committee’s annual safety report. The report contains freight carrying towing industry data and measures for calendar years 1994 to 2017.


8/22/2018: Marine Safety Alert 14-18, Gangways and ladders

The Inspections and Compliance Directorate issued a marine safety alert following the death of a vessel pilot who died while boarding a vessel when its gangway separated from the vessel, causing two persons to fall into the water. Although the investigation is still underway and additional facts are being gathered, this marine safety alert is intended to remind mariners that shipboard equipment that seems quite benign can quickly become a hazard to persons boarding and departing a vessel.


8/20/2018: Lifejacket approval harmonization

The Coast Guard announced in the Federal Register that it is seeking public comment on a policy letter to harmonize personal flotation device (PFD) standards between the United States and Canada by accepting a new standard for approval of PFDs.


8/16/2018: Marine Safety Alert – Potential interference of VHF-FM radio and AIS reception

The Office of Investigation and Analysis released Marine Safety Alert 13-18 to alert mariners about reports regarding poor reception on VHF frequencies used for radiotelephone, digital selective calling (DSC) and automatic identification systems (AIS) when in the vicinity of light emitting diode (LED) on-board ships (e.g., navigation lights, searchlights and floodlights, interior and exterior lights, adornment). Radio frequency interference caused by these LED lamps was found to create potential safety hazards.


8/9/2018: Recap of Coast Guard-American Waterways Operators steering committee meeting

The Coast Guard-American Waterways Operators Safety Partnership held its National Quality Steering Committee meeting July 31, 2018, with an agenda focusing on the concerns of the partnership and industry. This meeting marked the first NQSC meeting since Subchapter M towing vessel regulations went into effect July 20, 2018.


8/1/2018: Marine Safety Information Bulletin 06-18, Amphibious Passenger Vessel Operations

A Coast Guard Marine Board of Investigation has been convened and will conduct a thorough and comprehensive investigation to determine casual factors that contributed to the loss of the Stretch Duck 07. However, the Coast Guard and amphibious passenger vessel industry do not have to delay until the MBI has completed their investigation before taking a proactive approach toward the safety of the vessels and their passengers.


7/25/2018: Hazards of parasail and watersport passenger transfers

The Office of Investigations and Analysis issued a Marine Safety Alert to educate professional mariners and the boating public about two recent incidents that led to serious injuries to passengers on uninspected parasail vessels during underway transfer from the vessel to an inflatable raft, (i.e., “banana boat”) that was being towed alongside the vessel by personal water craft (“Jet Ski”).


07/17/2018: TugSafe Lite is now TugSafe Central with two new sections and more links to useful information

TugSafe Lite has been expanded and retitled TugSafe Central and is an important online source for Subchapter M compliance requirements and guidance. It has two new sections and new links to regulatory cites, USCG guidance documents and a link to a downloadable electronic version that is also printer-friendly.


7/16/2018: Covered areas on open decks – risks and requirements for passenger vessels

The evolution of passenger amenities on cruise ships has far surpassed the original language of the existing regulations. This is particularly evident on open deck areas where the current trend to situate a variety of cooking, dining, and entertainment options has increased the fire risk. When combined with an overhanging deck, awning, or similar covered area, these risks are compounded. This post provides information and guidance to minimize the risk of fires stemming from overhanging decks on board passenger ships.


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